38 Years Since We Got Alien-ated

“I can’t lie to you about your chances, but… you have my sympathies” – Ash.

OK, that was cold. “Alien” is one of the best sci-fi horror films ever. Period. There is no person even remotely familiar with the genre who will argue with this statement. Ever since its release 38 years ago, this film somehow manages to scare generations of the viewers all around the world.

And for a good reason. “Alien” messes with the ultimate fear of an unknown terror that lurks behind every corner and is ready to attack immediately – fast, brutal, and bloody. There are not too many films that managed to capture the sense of an almost cosmic terror, the feeling that the entire universe is against you. That is what has endowed “Alien” with that Lovecraftian feel. Xenomorph is the ultimate hunter and the ultimate horror.

“Alien” was directed by Ridley Scott and written by Dan O’Bannon, and it turned out to be a match made in heaven. The film also introduced one of the first fierce female characters brilliantly acted by then lesser known actress Sigourney Weaver. Besides her, stellar performances were given by Tom Skerritt, legendary Harry Dean Stanton, John Hurt, Ian Holm and Yaphet Kotto. As it turned out, this film was the start of a very lucrative franchise, followed by three more direct sequels, a couple of spin-off films and a great number of comic books, video games… But, to be truthful, only the second film in the series, “Aliens”, directed by James Cameron, lived up to the expectations. It was equally groundbreaking, but entirely different pacing entirely. “Alien” was a survival horror, while “Aliens” was knee-deep in a war epic film. Situated in space, though.

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What else there is to say? Grab the alien, and grab it now, or else…

Trackbacks

  1. […] carefully observing his performance in “Live and Let Die”, Ridley Scott sent Kotto his script for “Alien”. However, there’s another reason, and it’s somewhat […]

  2. […] But the real success was his next movie – Alien. By then, Ridley Scott had recognised the importance of making expensive movies brimming with special effects to achieve commercial success. So, he accepted to work on Alien, and it finally happened the way he wanted it to happen – it ascended the stairway to stardom. Not just that – the movie quickly became a classic. […]

  3. […] John Hurt’s character was the first to die in Ridley Scott’s “Alien“. […]

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